Darxus

Nikola Tesla's wireless energy

Nikola Tesla's wireless energy

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2009-09-29
The only electronics kit I ever had demonstrated that you didn't need a power source for a radio reciever, which is kind of neat.

So couldn't you just radio broadcast a 60z tone, rip the headphone off that unpowered radio reciever and attach an a/c volt meter and get a reading?


I had heard that Tesla thought he had figured out how to charge the sky to give everyone free electricity, but that must have been crazy, right?

A couple days ago I watched this:
http://www.wimp.com/nikolatesla
That was the first time I heard he was building a radio tower to attempt the first trans-atlantic transmission - which also happened to be his sky charging machine. So he had broadcasting access to the entire electromagnetic spectrum, and presumably lots of power.

And thismorning I lay in bed lazily contemplating how a radio transmission becomes an audible tone. Since I'm not much of an electronics geek, I first thought, hey, that makes a speeker reciprocate, and generating electricity off of that is easy - before I realized you could just use the speaker inputs as power outputs.

Anybody have a radio transmitter, perhaps one of the tiny ones for getting a cd player to talk to a car stereo? Those unamplified radio kits must be cheap.

What am I missing here? How is wireless power not obvious?

I remember reading recently that somebody finally recently invented wireless power - something involving ocelating electromagnetic waves - duh.

Funding for Tesla's transmitter was cut off when they found out about the broadcast electricity thing, because the people with the money wanted to keep charging for the electricity.
  • So couldn't you just radio broadcast a 60z tone, rip the headphone off that unpowered radio reciever and attach an a/c volt meter and get a reading?

    yes.

    the real problem is you can't transmit a lot of power that way without frying animals in its path. but i've heard folks at at least one mit lab claim that one of the local boston radio stations broadcasts with enough power that they use it to power small distributed electronics projects.
    • The other thing that needs to be considered is that even if you can pull significant amount of energy out of the air (just need a bigger antenna), you can never pull out more energy than you put in.

      A fairly simple way of looking at this problem would be to think of it as someone shining a bright light providing "free" energy to every one with solar collectors. It's quite obvious in this case that only a small fraction of the energy produced at the center is recovered by the users. Also note that users closer to the source can block users further away. What Tesla promoting was fairly similar and differed primarily only in the wavelengths involved and the specific technologies used to generate and collect energy at those wavelengths. At the wavelengths Tesla was using it was harder to outright block the energy from the users behind you but certainly not impossible.
  • While there is little science listed in these articles, it may give a starting point for how other people are approaching the problem (and they are approaching the problem)...

    http://gadgetwise.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/03/13/wireless-electricity-not-so-far-off/?scp=14&sq=electricity&st=cse

    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/09/magazine/09wirelessenergy.html?_r=1&scp=2&sq=wireless%20electricity&st=cse
  • Have you read the graphic novel The Five Fists of Science - it's about (sort of) Tesla's wireless energy.
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